Writing as training as writing is training

It’s been a little while since I blogged! I wanted to I wanted to highlight a new paper I authored called “A Systematist’s Guide to Estimating Bayesian Phylogenies From Morphological Data.”

This paper was a long time coming. It started as the forward to my dissertation, in fact! In the time since, one issue I’ve persistently come across is needing to onboard young systematists into research. I work at a primarily undergraduate institution, which means my students are, well, undergraduates. And to get them involved in research can be tough! In statistical phylogenetics, there’s no real equivalent of washing test tubes or feeding fish while you read papers and develop an independent project. Getting involved in our work means getting to work, right away. It’s like drinking from a firehose.

Computation is still not heavily incorporated in curricula basically anywhere. I have students take my computational biology course before starting in the lab, so that I don’t need to teach every student, personally, how to use Python or R.

But I do still need to work with students fairly intensively on systematics and mathematical modeling. This manuscript came from a need to have something accessible I could hand to each student, and say “Here, this is what we do in the Wright lab.” It’s a labor of love for the science. But it’s also a labor of love for me. Writing all this down in one place allowed me to reduce my training burden, and providing a solid overview of these methods allows the students to get a solid grounding on methods and be exposed to some of the literature.

I’ve already had multiple lab members tell me that the paper was clarifying for them to read. As I get older, as I train more students, that’s the only thing I really want to hear: that a paper helped them learn to be systematists, and helped them think through problems better. I hope it will for you, too.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s